exhibition
Tim Gardner, Above the Blowhole, 2009. NGC Collection. © Tim Gardner
Tim Gardner, Above the Blowhole, 2009. NGC Collection. © Tim Gardner
Peter Doig, 100 Years Ago, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, 100 Years Ago, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Surfer, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Surfer, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Tim Gardner, Untitled (Bryan with Hot Dog, 2008. NGC Collection. © Tim Gardner
Tim Gardner, Untitled (Bryan with Hot Dog), 2008. NGC Collection. © Tim Gardner
Sarah Anne Johnson, Circling the Arctic, 2011. CMCP Collection. © Sarah Anne Johnson
Sarah Anne Johnson, Circling the Arctic, 2011. CMCP Collection. © Sarah Anne Johnson
Sarah Anne Johnson, Bubble, 2011. CMCP Collection. © Sarah Anne Johnson
Sarah Anne Johnson, Bubble, 2011. CMCP Collection. © Sarah Anne Johnson
Tim Gardner, Untitled (Orange Tent, Sombrio), 2008. NGC Collection. © Tim Gardner
Tim Gardner, Untitled (Orange Tent, Sombrio), 2008. NGC Collection. © Tim Gardner
Peter Doig, Pinto, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Pinto, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Big Sur, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Big Sur, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Drifter, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Drifter, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Country Rock, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Peter Doig, Country Rock, 2001. NGC Collection. © Peter Doig
Sarah Anne Johnson, Explosions, 2011. CMCP Collection. © Sarah Anne Johnson
Sarah Anne Johnson, Explosions, 2011. CMCP Collection. © Sarah Anne Johnson
Feb 04, 2012 - Apr 01, 2012

Peter Doig, Tim Gardner, Sarah Anne Johnson

Organized by the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art and the National Gallery of Canada

Opening reception: February 4, 2-5pm

The expression “losing yourself in the wilderness” takes on new meaning in works by Peter Doig, Sarah Anne Johnson and Tim Gardner. Here ambiguous, hallucinatory vistas collide with sublime, pastoral scenes and the idea of the ruggedness of the hinterland clashes with its ultimate fragility. In each case, the realism of the works is interrupted by a sense of sheer uncanny. Doig’s etchings are kaleidoscopic renderings that draw as much from urban experience as they do from the countryside; Gardner’s pristine watercolours play with idealized notions of the great outdoors, while the whimsy of Johnson’s photographs is marred by their apocalyptic undertones. These multifarious landscapes mix autobiography with illusion and the banal with the extraordinary, offering striking images that suggest a shift in our perceived relationship with the natural world.