exhibition
Daniel Barrow, Eye Drop Drawing from the series Every Time I See Your Picture I Cry, 2006. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photo © National Gallery of Canada
Daniel Barrow, Eye Drop Drawing from the series Every Time I See Your Picture I Cry, 2006. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photo © National Gallery of Canada
Daniel Barrow uses an overhead projector to bring his drawings of forlorn, fragile and, at times, pitiable characters, to life in live-animation performances that recall the enchantment of Victorian-era magic lantern shows. This suite of drawings exemplifies the artist’s illustrative style, which borrows from graphic novels and vintage children’s storybooks, and demonstrates his interest in exploring states of loneliness, vulnerability, nostalgia and anx- iety through narrative. The violence of this particular tale, juxtaposed with Barrow’s ability to find beauty in the mundane and sorrowful aspects of life, lends a poignancy and pathos to his protagonist who plays with our senses of humour, distress, empathy and, alarm.
Daniel Barrow, Contact Lens Drawing from the series Every Time I See Your Picture I Cry, 2006. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photo © National Gallery of Canada
Daniel Barrow, Contact Lens Drawing from the series Every Time I See Your Picture I Cry, 2006. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photo © National Gallery of Canada
Daniel Barrow uses an overhead projector to bring his drawings of forlorn, fragile and, at times, pitiable characters, to life in live-animation performances that recall the enchantment of Victorian-era magic lantern shows. This suite of drawings exemplifies the artist’s illustrative style, which borrows from graphic novels and vintage children’s storybooks, and demonstrates his interest in exploring states of loneliness, vulnerability, nostalgia and anx- iety through narrative. The violence of this particular tale, juxtaposed with Barrow’s ability to find beauty in the mundane and sorrowful aspects of life, lends a poignancy and pathos to his protagonist who plays with our senses of humour, distress, empathy and, alarm.

DANIEL BARROW has exhibited widely in Canada and abroad. He has performed at The Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), PS1 Contemporary Art Center (New York), The Museum of Contemporary Art (Los Angeles), The International Film Festival Rotterdam, The Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s TBA festival, and the British Film Institute’s London Film Festival. Barrow is the winner of the 2010 Sobey Art Award. He is represented by Jessica Bradley Art + Projects, Toronto.